“Save Roe”

By Julie Zaebst, Project Manager, Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project

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It has been 42 years since the Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade legalized abortion, but somehow, on this cold, slushy Thursday, I found myself standing in the middle of Broad Street holding a sign that said “Save Roe.”

Some days, I wonder how we got to the point where it doesn’t seem far-fetched to say that Roe needs saving. Today, though, I was grateful to stand with a small crowd in Center City Philadelphia and remind passersby what safe, legal abortion means for women and their families. Of course, it’s about the ability to decide when and under what circumstances to take on the incredible responsibility of having a child. But it’s also about access to basic health care for women. It’s about financial stability. It’s about opportunities and dreams. It’s about respect and equality.

A lot of people on Broad Street today understood that. We got honks of support and thumbs-up. People rolled down their car windows to cheer and say thank you. The only counter-protestor who dared to join us kept her headphones in the whole time.

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(This rally was organized by Planned Parenthood Southeastern pennsylvania)

I wish I could have brought members of Congress out today to see that the American people get it – and that we’re paying attention. Late last night, the House of Representatives dropped plans to vote on a bill that would have banned abortion after the 20th week of pregnancy, amid concerns about the “optics” of the issue. This sounds like a victory, but instead, the House approved a bill that targets abortion access for low-income women: HR 7 would ban federal insurance coverage of abortion, including in insurance policies sold on the state exchanges.

I’m afraid I’ll be back on Broad Street at this time next year, still holding my “Save Roe” sign. I hope you’ll be there to join me.

ACLU ACTION >> Protect Women’s Reproductive Decisions

Julie Julie Zaebst joined the ACLU-PA in July 2014, bringing more than 10 years of experience as a program manager and advocate.

Abortion: Breaking the Silence

By Lisa Wildman, Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project Intern

Clara Bell Duvall

Clara Bell Duvall

Why are we re-fighting abortion forty years after Roe v. Wade? State legislators across the country are putting forth regulations that target abortion at an increasing rate. Alarmingly, many of these have become law. Why have these laws succeeded in eroding abortion rights?

A big part of the answer lies in the stigma surrounding abortion, which has helped keep abortion hidden. The movement working against abortion has shamed and intimidated people who seek abortions and those who provide abortion care. Look and listen to the condemning, demonizing language they use outside of clinics. When I volunteered as a clinic escort, why did protesters call me a whore? And who can forget Rush Limbaugh’s vicious slander of Sandra Fluke just for seeking birth control? American society is uncomfortable with abortion in part because it is uncomfortable with female sexuality. The war over abortion is a war over who controls women’s bodies. If we use our reproductive rights, we frighten those who would control our bodies for us.

A woman considering abortion care likely feels very alone and frightened. I know I did. Many Americans may think that they do not know anyone who has chosen to have an abortion. But one woman in three has an abortion by age 45. We all know someone who has had had an abortion. She is our coworker, our friend, our neighbor, our sister, our mother. In fact, most women who choose abortion are already mothers.

Silence perpetuates the stigma surrounding abortion. We can help remove the stigma surrounding abortion by breaking the silence. Empower yourself by beginning to talk about abortion. If a family member of yours died from an abortion in pre-Roe days, tell that story. (Mitt Romney did.) If you are pro-choice, say so. If you had an abortion, say so. Tell anyone who will listen.

Studies have found that how we talk about abortion does make a difference. Talk about how abortion is a personal and private decision. Talk about how abortion is a right under the U.S. Constitution, not something that should vary state by state. Talk about how politicians should not be allowed to interfere in what is a decision a woman makes with her own doctor and her own family.

But most importantly, keep on talking.

Learn more about the Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project.

Lisa WildmanLisa Wildman interned at the ACLU-PA’s Duvall Project while completing a master’s degree in social work at Temple University.