Thank You, Abortion Providers!

By Marah Lange, MSW, former Duvall Project intern

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Last Wednesday was an important day in the fight to protect abortion access.

As the justices gathered to hear arguments in Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt, thousands came together outside the U.S. Supreme Court to have our voices heard: stop the sham. While Texas’s HB2 and similar laws are engineered to appear to be focused on protecting women’s health, they do just the opposite. In fact, they restrict access to safe abortion by placing medically unnecessary restrictions on providers and causing clinics to close. For patients, this creates an obstacle course of barriers to having an abortion. If I have to travel hundreds of miles for my procedure, who can watch my children? Will my employer allow me the time off I need to travel for my appointment? How will I afford the cost of travel in addition to the cost of my procedure?

This is something we need to be shouting about. And on March 2nd, we shouted! I was one of 60 people who took a 5 a.m. bus from Philadelphia to Washington, DC, to join the Rally to Protect Abortion Access that day. Once on board the bus, I sensed excitement, adventure and, with some bus mates who had been in the fight since Roe, camaraderie. I also felt some trepidation. This was my first large-scale abortion rally, and I did not know what to expect from the opposition. After some coffee, chanting, and eventually a sunrise, we arrived and joined over a thousand other advocates who came together to defend access to abortion (and to show off some fantastic posters).

The Rally to Protect Abortion Access was also a platform for celebration. Women gathered to share their abortion stories, leaders of the fight spoke of their mission to protect access, and abortion providers were met with cheers of gratitude for their dedication to caring for patients with respect and dignity. It was electric.

While advocates await the court’s decision in June, today marks the National Day of Appreciation for Abortion Providers. We observe this day each year on the anniversary of the death of Dr. David Gunn, one of several abortion providers and clinic workers murdered by an anti-choice extremists. It is a day to show our gratitude for the courageous medical professionals who provide abortion care despite political interference and often threats of violence. Each day, providers stand in solidarity with patients who have chosen abortion for themselves and their families. Today we stand with those same providers and say “thank you.”

Thank you, Providers!

THANK YOU to the providers who work hard every day to make sure that people across Pennsylvania have access to the abortion care they need! We appreciate all you do to make reproductive rights a reality. #AppreciateProviders #NDAAPPlanned Parenthood Southeastern Pennsylvania, Planned Parenthood Keystone, PPWP–Planned Parenthood of Western PA, Philadelphia Women's Center, Allentown Women's Center, Delaware County Women's Center, Allegheny Reproductive Health Center Physicians for Reproductive Health

Posted by ACLU of Pennsylvania on Thursday, March 10, 2016

Using ‘Artivism’ to Combat Abortion Stigma

By Marah Lange, MSW Intern, Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project

In my time as an intern at the Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project, I have considered ways I could connect my work to my experience as a student at the University of Pennsylvania. Since attending Abortion Out Loud: Lifting the Scarlet A last fall at Haverford College and hearing Louise Melling, Director of Center of Liberty and Deputy Legal Director at the ACLU, speak about the impact of abortion stigma in the legislature and more broadly, I have been eager to play my part in fighting stigma.

Last week, the 1 in 3 Campaign gave me that chance in the form of “artivism.” As a grassroots organization, the 1 in 3 Campaign is dedicated to creating a platform where women can share their stories in an effort to “build a culture of compassion, empathy, and support for access to basic health care”. Since 1 in 3 women will have an abortion in their lifetime, each will undoubtedly have a different set of circumstances surrounding their experience and sharing those stories is powerful.

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These images are part of an “artivism” display at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Social Policy and Practice to help support the 1 in 3 campaign.

To support this campaign, I and many other student activists across the country posted real stories of women and their abortions in busy public spaces on our campuses. It was my intention for these stories to spark conversation among fellow students and to shed light on the fact that many women will make the decision to have an abortion and that is okay. I am hopeful that this small attempt at fighting stigma will have an effect on my campus and that those who observed the display will carry the stories with them as social work professionals and advocates moving forward.

To see the full display, please visit the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Social Policy and Practice.

Supreme Court Decision in Young v. UPS Highlights Need for Change in Pennsylvania

By Marah Lange, MSW Candidate, University of Pennsylvania

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Last week, women across the country celebrated when the Supreme Court ruled in support of pregnant workers in the case Young v. UPS.

When Peggy Young was pregnant with her now 7-year-old daughter, her doctor recommended she not lift more than 20 pounds. What happened next takes place all too often: UPS, her employer at the time, refused to provide her temporary accommodations, as it typically did for other workers, including people with disabilities, people with on-the-job injuries, and even people who had lost their commercial drivers’ licenses as a result of DUI convictions.

Despite Peggy’s willingness to keep working with simple modifications to her job, she was forced to take unpaid leave and go without income during a time when she needed it most. So Peggy went to court.

Last week’s Supreme Court decision sent Peggy’s case back to the lower courts, which originally ruled in UPS’s favor. And more importantly, it signaled to all employers that if they are accommodating most other workers with injuries or disabilities while refusing to accommodate most pregnant workers who need it, they are likely violating the Pregnancy Discrimination Act.

While this ruling is a significant victory, many pregnant workers may continue to face difficulty requesting and receiving temporary accommodations or successfully challenging employers that discriminate. For example, women in smaller workplaces, women who are new to their jobs, and workers with limited bargaining power may not know their employers’ accommodations policies or the accommodations their co-workers have received.

That’s why 13 states, including Peggy’s home state of Maryland, have passed legislation to strengthen protections for pregnant workers. Now it’s time for Pennsylvania legislators to step up to the plate. The Pennsylvania Pregnant Workers Fairness Act would strengthen protections for pregnant workers and help ensure that women aren’t put in the unnecessary and unsafe position of choosing between the health of their pregnancies and their jobs. This is especially critical for women working in low-wage jobs and for the 41 percent of families in which women are the primary breadwinners.

In order for women to have the freedom to make reproductive decisions for themselves and their families – like decision to have a child while working – temporary and reasonable accommodations for pregnant workers are a must.

Marah Lange is an MSW Candidate at the University of Pennsylvania. She currently interns for the Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project.