Thank You, Abortion Providers!

By Marah Lange, MSW, former Duvall Project intern

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Last Wednesday was an important day in the fight to protect abortion access.

As the justices gathered to hear arguments in Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt, thousands came together outside the U.S. Supreme Court to have our voices heard: stop the sham. While Texas’s HB2 and similar laws are engineered to appear to be focused on protecting women’s health, they do just the opposite. In fact, they restrict access to safe abortion by placing medically unnecessary restrictions on providers and causing clinics to close. For patients, this creates an obstacle course of barriers to having an abortion. If I have to travel hundreds of miles for my procedure, who can watch my children? Will my employer allow me the time off I need to travel for my appointment? How will I afford the cost of travel in addition to the cost of my procedure?

This is something we need to be shouting about. And on March 2nd, we shouted! I was one of 60 people who took a 5 a.m. bus from Philadelphia to Washington, DC, to join the Rally to Protect Abortion Access that day. Once on board the bus, I sensed excitement, adventure and, with some bus mates who had been in the fight since Roe, camaraderie. I also felt some trepidation. This was my first large-scale abortion rally, and I did not know what to expect from the opposition. After some coffee, chanting, and eventually a sunrise, we arrived and joined over a thousand other advocates who came together to defend access to abortion (and to show off some fantastic posters).

The Rally to Protect Abortion Access was also a platform for celebration. Women gathered to share their abortion stories, leaders of the fight spoke of their mission to protect access, and abortion providers were met with cheers of gratitude for their dedication to caring for patients with respect and dignity. It was electric.

While advocates await the court’s decision in June, today marks the National Day of Appreciation for Abortion Providers. We observe this day each year on the anniversary of the death of Dr. David Gunn, one of several abortion providers and clinic workers murdered by an anti-choice extremists. It is a day to show our gratitude for the courageous medical professionals who provide abortion care despite political interference and often threats of violence. Each day, providers stand in solidarity with patients who have chosen abortion for themselves and their families. Today we stand with those same providers and say “thank you.”

Thank you, Providers!

THANK YOU to the providers who work hard every day to make sure that people across Pennsylvania have access to the abortion care they need! We appreciate all you do to make reproductive rights a reality. #AppreciateProviders #NDAAPPlanned Parenthood Southeastern Pennsylvania, Planned Parenthood Keystone, PPWP–Planned Parenthood of Western PA, Philadelphia Women's Center, Allentown Women's Center, Delaware County Women's Center, Allegheny Reproductive Health Center Physicians for Reproductive Health

Posted by ACLU of Pennsylvania on Thursday, March 10, 2016

Does Your Pharmacy Carry the Morning-After Pill?

By Kaziah White & Saskia Levy-Sheon, Interns, Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project

Emergency Contraception Map

We visited pharmacies around the region to find out if they had the morning-after pill in stock and if their employees incorrectly said there were age limits or asked for ID. The map shows you where you can easily get the morning-after pill.

During the summer of 2015, the Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project was asked to help collect data on the availability of emergency contraception (EC) at local pharmacies, as part of a nationwide survey created by the American Society for Emergency Contraception. Emergency contraception prevents pregnancy by stopping ovulation or keeping the egg and sperm from meeting if taken within three to five days after unprotected sex.

We surveyed 65 pharmacies in Philadelphia and on the Main Line. These pharmacies range from the well-stocked store with multiple types of EC to the empty room with a few chairs and a well-meaning pharmacist offering us a “good price” on a generic brand of the morning-after pill.

The survey asks about where EC is located within the store, as well as what brands are available and how much they cost. It also involves asking pharmacy staff if you have to be a certain age to purchase EC and if men can buy it.

The Food and Drug Administration regulations for emergency contraception have rapidly changed within the past few years. One-pill EC is now available over the counter to anyone, regardless of age or gender. However, a number of the pharmacies we visited aren’t consistently following these new regulations. Employees have asked us for ID, or told us that EC can only be purchased by people over age 15, 17 or 18. When employees give out misinformation like this to their customers, it prevents young women from accessing the emergency health care that they need in order to prevent pregnancy. Keeping EC behind the pharmacy counter or in a locked display case in the aisle creates another barrier to access, as young people may feel embarrassed or uncomfortable asking a staff member to retrieve it for them.

The Duvall Project’s new resource for young people seeking health care on their own, Your Body, Your Rights, gives information about emergency contraception and teens’ rights to access it, regardless of age or gender. This information is critical because emergency contraception is often the last step one can take to prevent an unplanned pregnancy. However, conducting this survey showed us that practice hasn’t caught up with policy, and teens might have trouble getting EC at their local pharmacies if the staff there aren’t familiar with the new regulations.

In our research we discovered patterns of access to EC across Philadelphia. About a third of the Center City pharmacies that we visited gave us inaccurate information about age limits. We also found that non-chain pharmacies, which are more prevalent in low-income areas of the city, are far more likely to keep EC behind the pharmacy counter or in locked display cases and to provide inaccurate age limits.

The next step in our process was to create a two-pronged approach to help ensure that teens have access to EC. We started by contacting the pharmacies that provided us with misinformation in order to ask them to train their staff on the new federal regulations around EC. Second, we developed an interactive map to help teens learn which pharmacies make EC is most accessible and affordable. The interactive maps helps guide teenagers to pharmacies that will respect their control over their own bodies and give them the resources that they need. Until all pharmacy practices are in line with current regulations, the EC map will provide a valuable tool for youth to protect their reproductive freedom.

Visit ybyr.org to use the interactive map!

Using ‘Artivism’ to Combat Abortion Stigma

By Marah Lange, MSW Intern, Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project

In my time as an intern at the Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project, I have considered ways I could connect my work to my experience as a student at the University of Pennsylvania. Since attending Abortion Out Loud: Lifting the Scarlet A last fall at Haverford College and hearing Louise Melling, Director of Center of Liberty and Deputy Legal Director at the ACLU, speak about the impact of abortion stigma in the legislature and more broadly, I have been eager to play my part in fighting stigma.

Last week, the 1 in 3 Campaign gave me that chance in the form of “artivism.” As a grassroots organization, the 1 in 3 Campaign is dedicated to creating a platform where women can share their stories in an effort to “build a culture of compassion, empathy, and support for access to basic health care”. Since 1 in 3 women will have an abortion in their lifetime, each will undoubtedly have a different set of circumstances surrounding their experience and sharing those stories is powerful.

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These images are part of an “artivism” display at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Social Policy and Practice to help support the 1 in 3 campaign.

To support this campaign, I and many other student activists across the country posted real stories of women and their abortions in busy public spaces on our campuses. It was my intention for these stories to spark conversation among fellow students and to shed light on the fact that many women will make the decision to have an abortion and that is okay. I am hopeful that this small attempt at fighting stigma will have an effect on my campus and that those who observed the display will carry the stories with them as social work professionals and advocates moving forward.

To see the full display, please visit the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Social Policy and Practice.

Supreme Court Decision in Young v. UPS Highlights Need for Change in Pennsylvania

By Marah Lange, MSW Candidate, University of Pennsylvania

Map

Last week, women across the country celebrated when the Supreme Court ruled in support of pregnant workers in the case Young v. UPS.

When Peggy Young was pregnant with her now 7-year-old daughter, her doctor recommended she not lift more than 20 pounds. What happened next takes place all too often: UPS, her employer at the time, refused to provide her temporary accommodations, as it typically did for other workers, including people with disabilities, people with on-the-job injuries, and even people who had lost their commercial drivers’ licenses as a result of DUI convictions.

Despite Peggy’s willingness to keep working with simple modifications to her job, she was forced to take unpaid leave and go without income during a time when she needed it most. So Peggy went to court.

Last week’s Supreme Court decision sent Peggy’s case back to the lower courts, which originally ruled in UPS’s favor. And more importantly, it signaled to all employers that if they are accommodating most other workers with injuries or disabilities while refusing to accommodate most pregnant workers who need it, they are likely violating the Pregnancy Discrimination Act.

While this ruling is a significant victory, many pregnant workers may continue to face difficulty requesting and receiving temporary accommodations or successfully challenging employers that discriminate. For example, women in smaller workplaces, women who are new to their jobs, and workers with limited bargaining power may not know their employers’ accommodations policies or the accommodations their co-workers have received.

That’s why 13 states, including Peggy’s home state of Maryland, have passed legislation to strengthen protections for pregnant workers. Now it’s time for Pennsylvania legislators to step up to the plate. The Pennsylvania Pregnant Workers Fairness Act would strengthen protections for pregnant workers and help ensure that women aren’t put in the unnecessary and unsafe position of choosing between the health of their pregnancies and their jobs. This is especially critical for women working in low-wage jobs and for the 41 percent of families in which women are the primary breadwinners.

In order for women to have the freedom to make reproductive decisions for themselves and their families – like decision to have a child while working – temporary and reasonable accommodations for pregnant workers are a must.

Marah Lange is an MSW Candidate at the University of Pennsylvania. She currently interns for the Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project.

Protect Pennsylvania’s Pregnant Workers

By Julie Zaebst, Project Manager, Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project
Pregnant
Anyone who has been pregnant or accompanied a partner through pregnancy knows it’s not always easy, even under the best circumstances. When my partner was pregnant with our son last year, she was perfectly healthy and had what you would call an “easy pregnancy.” But still, her lifestyle changed (and mine along with it!). At work, my partner ate small snacks throughout the day, used the restroom more often, and stood up to stretch and walk around every now and then. That’s what she needed to do to stay healthy.

But imagine having to choose between a healthy pregnancy and your job – right at the moment when your income and your employer-sponsored health insurance (if you’re lucky enough to have it) are most important. Too many pregnant women, especially those in low-wage or physically demanding jobs, are put in that position because their employers refuse to accommodate pregnant women in the same way that they routinely accommodate other workers, including those who are injured on the job or are covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). And unfortunately some courts have agreed that this is OK.

In many cases, pregnant women need simple job modifications to be able to continue to work – more frequent restroom breaks, a stool to sit on, or permission to carry a water bottle. In some cases, they may need to be put on light duty. But by definition, these are temporary accommodations. Studies show that accommodating pregnancy-related conditions is typically low-cost and low-effort. And there are big benefits for employers, including increased worker productivity and retention.

Recognizing these benefits for employees and employers, Pittsburgh City Council passed two common-sense measures designed to protect pregnant women in the workplace. One measure clarifies that discrimination based on sex includes discrimination based on pregnancy, childbirth or a related condition. This strengthens anti-discrimination protections for pregnant workers. The other measure requires many city contractors to provide reasonable accommodations to enable pregnant women to continue in their jobs, unless this would impose an undue hardship on the employer.

Unfortunately, Pittsburgh City Council doesn’t have the authority under state law to expand protections to pregnant women who work for private employers. Now, it’s up to the state legislature to step in and pass the Pennsylvania Pregnant Workers Fairness Act, which would provide coverage to more women in Pittsburgh and protect women in other parts of the state as well. This must be a priority when the legislature reconvenes in the new year.

In 2014, it should not be news to anyone that women are in the workforce, and they are often the sole or primary breadwinners for their families. It’s time for the law to catch up with reality and protect pregnant workers from having to make an impossible choice. Pennsylvania women should not be forced to choose between their health and their livelihood anymore.

Julie Zaebst joined the ACLU-PA in July 2014, bringing more than 10 years of experience as a program manager and advocate.

Meet Julie Zaebst, Project Manager of The Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project

Julie Zaebst

Julie Zaebst

Julie Zaebst joined the ACLU-PA in July 2014, bringing more than 10 years of experience as a program manager and advocate. Most recently, she directed the Policy Center at the Coalition Against Hunger, where she led the organization’s advocacy initiatives to protect and enhance the federal nutrition programs in Pennsylvania, including food stamps and school meals. Before getting started, we asked Julie some questions about her previous experience and what she’s looking forward to in her new role as Project Manager of the Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project.

What most interested you about this position?

I always imagined that I would devote my career to women’s health and reproductive rights. These were the issues that first politicized me as a student, and I spent much of my time and energy as a student and young professional working on these issues in a volunteer capacity. But a different opportunity came my way. Instead, I had a chance to serve as an advocate for low-income people who are struggling with hunger and for the federal nutrition programs, like food stamps, that help them put healthy food on the table. This has been an incredible experience, and I’ve learned a lot about what it takes to be an effective advocate. I’m excited to have the opportunity to bring my skills and passion to the issue of reproductive rights at the ACLU of Pennsylvania.

Where were you before joining the Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project and the ACLU of Pennsylvania?

Over the past 10 years, I’ve worn many different hats at the Coalition Against Hunger – volunteer coordinator, advocacy coordinator and interim executive director. Most recently, I managed the Coalition’s policy center, where I directed initiatives to protect and enhance the federal nutrition programs in Pennsylvania, including food stamps, school meals, and the child care food program.

Prior to that, I served as the Associate Director of the Civic Engagement Office at Bryn Mawr College, which facilitates service-learning and volunteer opportunities for undergraduates. I learned an enormous amount from the students, faculty and community partners about what it means to be an engaged citizen and how to foster that type of engagement in our communities.

How do you think your previous experiences will help you in this new role?

In my roles at the Coalition Against Hunger and at Bryn Mawr College, I had the chance to hone a diverse set of skills that I’ll be tapping into as the Duvall Project Manager: public education, constituent mobilization, coalition-building, and legislative and administrative advocacy. I love putting these different strategies and skills to work to effect policy change, and I’m thrilled to have the chance to do so in the area of reproductive rights in Pennsylvania.

What are you most excited about taking over the project?

I’m excited to carry forward the incredible work that the Duvall Project has been doing to ensure incarcerated women’s access to reproductive health services. This initiative raises critical civil liberties issues that sit at the intersection of prisoners’ rights and reproductive rights, and I see ACLU-PA as uniquely positioned to address these issues that otherwise might go unnoticed. Carol has laid a terrific groundwork for this initiative, both in terms of research and relationship-building, and the Duvall Project has already achieved some great successes in reforming jails’ policies about reproductive health care.

What are some future projects you foresee the CBD Project taking on?

Recently, I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about the ways that stigma impacts the issues that I care about and the public policy work that I do. For instance, I’ve worked closely with Witnesses to Hunger, a program at Drexel University that provides a space for mothers to share their personal experiences with hunger through photos and story-telling and that brings their perspectives to bear in policy debates about the nutrition programs. I’ve been humbled by these women’s willingness to share their experiences and impressed with the ways in which their personal stories can humanize and ground technical, often polarized public policy debates and influence their outcomes.

I was excited to hear that the ACLU is having a similar conversation about stigma around reproductive rights. I see great opportunity to address issues of stigma and center the voices and experiences of women and men who have had to grapple with difficult reproductive health decisions. By engaging in public education and organizing with the goal of addressing this stigma, I think we can begin to bring about the cultural shift necessary to ultimately affect public policy.

What do you think are the biggest obstacles to reproductive freedom?

It sometimes seems that the story of reproductive rights is one of death by a thousand cuts. The specific restrictions placed on women’s reproductive rights are often complex or obscure in nature, and considered in isolation they may seem insignificant to much of the general public. Yet together, this patchwork of laws and regulations makes access to safe and affordable abortions – and sometimes other critical reproductive health services – increasingly difficult for women across Pennsylvania, especially low-income women. One of the ongoing challenges for the reproductive rights movement will be to continue to educate supporters about the impact of these restrictions and to galvanize strong opposition to each and every effort to limit women’s reproductive freedoms. This is especially critical as more and more supporters – like myself – belong to the post-Roe generation and don’t have a personal, first-hand understanding of what it would mean to entirely lose the freedoms granted by that court decision.