Reproductive Rights are Human Rights

By Franchesca Ramirez, Summer Intern, ACLU of Pennsylvania

The state of Oregon has made recent headlines for its triumphant passing of the Reproductive Health Equity Act, a new law that ensures all residents of the state have access to health services, including family planning, abortion, and postpartum care. The act, proudly supported by the ACLU of Oregon, guarantees reproductive health care for all women, regardless of income, gender identity, or citizenship status. It represents defiance towards the Trump administration’s agenda and a beacon of hope for women in the rest of the country.

Meanwhile, in backward Pennsylvania, the state legislature is considering what would be one of the most restrictive policies against abortion in our nation, Senate Bill 3. SB 3 shortens the length of time during a pregnancy that a woman is permitted to have an abortion and entirely bans a common method of the procedure.

Also in the state legislature is Senate Bill 300, which restricts funding to Planned Parenthood and, thus, limits the accessibility of reproductive health care, including contraception, for Pennsylvania residents who rely on their services. This bill seeks to defund health care providers that offer abortions, in effect, defunding Planned Parenthood, the largest provider of these health services in the U.S. Planned Parenthood educates millions of people every year, offering knowledge and services for contraceptive care and preventing thousands of unplanned pregnancies. Unfortunately, there aren’t already enough other providers availing this knowledge and these services, so expecting them to absorb Planned Parenthood’s clientele is unimaginable. Informed family planning doesn’t just benefit individual families; it promotes the stability of the U.S. population. To protect reproductive rights is to honor the Constitution and protect the future of our country.

The reality is that millions of Americans would struggle without the information and preventative care necessary to plan their lives, possibly threatening their own health and the stability of their families. In this case, it wouldn’t be farfetched to predict that the number of abortions would increase access to contraception decreases.

Protecting reproductive rights is not a “women’s issue.” Reproductive rights are a human issue, like all other rights too often threatened by regressive policymakers. Stripping women of this liberty symbolizes a disregard for the rights of all Americans. It is not an issue that should be decided based on the selfish values of an elected few without consideration of the large populace they represent. Unsurprisingly, it is in Pennsylvania, the state ranking 48th in the country for the percentage of women in elected office, that this restrictive legislation is being considered. For too long, majority male officials in positions of power have applied their ignorance and short-term vision to policy affecting millions of people — particularly women, who have been historically underrepresented in society.

It is always necessary to put aside one’s own personal beliefs when making decisions that affect others. The issue of abortion is no exception. The best thing lawmakers in Pennsylvania can do is mirror the actions of Oregon’s legislators by voting to protect access to reproductive education and services, recognizing them as rights rather than ideological preferences.

Franchesca Ramirez interned this summer in the ACLU of Pennsylvania’s Harrisburg office, assisting the advocacy and communications departments. She is a second-year student at the University of Pennsylvania.

The work of defending civil liberties goes on

ACLU of Pennsylvania Executive Director Reggie Shuford addresses the crowd at the “Show Love for the Constitution” event. | February 15, 2017. (credit: Ben Bowens)

Dear supporter,

In some ways, our country changed on November 8. The United States elected a leader who, by all measures, is hostile to the basic foundations and principles that we stand for. President Trump and his regime deserve every ounce of pushback we can gather, and the ACLU will be on the front lines of the resistance.

And yet, at the ACLU of Pennsylvania, we have always taken the long view. Issues that are with us today were with us before November 8 and, to one degree or another, would have continued regardless of who was elected, including mass incarceration, police brutality, inequality for gay and transgender people, and efforts to compromise women’s access to reproductive healthcare.

You may have heard that there has been a major increase in giving to the ACLU since the election. While much of that growth has occurred at the national level, in fact, here in Pennsylvania, our membership has tripled. We saw a notable rise in donations after Election Day, but the real surge of giving happened after the weekend of the Muslim Ban. It was in that moment that many Pennsylvanians realized the significance of the threat to our values and to the people we most cherish.

You have put your trust in the ACLU in these challenging times. We are grateful for that trust and take it as a responsibility. Thank you.

The generous outpouring of support we’ve received in recent months has allowed us to think big about our work. It is my intention to add new staff to our existing staff of 22. Our current team has the talent, skills, and persistence to take on the many challenges before us. I also know that we can advance the cause of civil liberties throughout Pennsylvania by bringing even more talented people on board. The times demand it. Your support enables it.

In the months ahead, you’ll hear more about our Smart Justice campaign, our effort to reform, reinvent, and revamp the criminal justice system; our Transgender Public Education and Advocacy Project; the campaign for District Attorney in Philadelphia; the many bills we’re advocating for and against at the state capitol; and more litigation to push back against government excesses wherever they occur.

The ACLU of Pennsylvania is prepared to thwart the Trump administration’s worst instincts as they play out in the commonwealth.

And state and municipal officials aren’t off the hook. We’re working with immigrant communities to monitor federal immigration enforcement tactics while also standing with municipal governments that insist they won’t bend to every demand of ICE. We’re insisting that the commonwealth keeps its commitment to open beds for people who are too ill to stand trial and are being warehoused in local jails. We’re working at the state legislature to defeat efforts to hide the identity of police who seriously injure and kill people and to hide video that captures police brutality from the public. And we are active in ongoing struggles to diminish police presence in schools, to stop rollbacks of women’s reproductive healthcare, and to fight the practice of jailing people for their debts.

The ACLU of Pennsylvania has the infrastructure and the experience to defend civil rights at every turn. Consider some of our recent work:

  • Our legal team successfully freed travelers who were detained at Philadelphia International Airport the weekend of Muslim Ban 1.0, our advocacy team supported the protests at airports in Philly and Pittsburgh, and our communications staff echoed the message to #LetThemIn.
  • Two weeks ago, we settled a lawsuit against the School District of Lancaster for denying enrollment at its regular high school for older refugee students. Older refugee students will now be able to attend the regular high school instead of being segregated at an alternative school.
  • Over the last month, our legislative director has been busy at the state capitol in Harrisburg lobbying against efforts to reinstate mandatory minimum sentencing, which has been suspended for two years due to court rulings.
  • In tandem with allies, our advocacy team has launched the Philadelphia Coalition for a Just District Attorney, an effort to push the candidates for district attorney to commit to reforming the criminal justice system.
  • Last week, our lawyers filed to intervene to defend a school in Berks County that has been sued for affirming its students’ gender identity. We’re representing a transgender student and a youth advocacy organization who would be harmed if the lawsuit successfully overturns the school’s practice.

These five examples are just from the last two months. In fact, four of them happened in the last two weeks.

My favorite playwright, Pittsburgh native August Wilson, said this about gratitude in his play Two Trains Running:  “You walking around here with a ten-gallon bucket. Somebody put a little cupful in and you get mad ’cause it’s empty. You can’t go through life carrying a ten-gallon bucket. Get you a little cup. That’s all you need. Get you a little cup and somebody put a bit in and it’s half-full.”

Well, thanks to you, our ten-gallon bucket runneth over.

Onward!

Reggie Shuford
Executive Director, ACLU of Pennsylvania

Replacing Medical Judgment with Political Will: PA Pushing Extreme Anti-Abortion Bill, Again

By Amanda Cappelletti, Larry Frankel Legislative Fellow, ACLU of Pennsylvania

Gov. Wolf announces his intention to veto SB3 at a press conference in Philadelphia (credit: Ben Bowens)

The legislative session has barely begun, and we’re already seeing some of the most extreme bills being introduced and pushed through. In that collective is Senate Bill 3, a bill that would ban abortion after 20 weeks and would ban a medically proven, safe method of abortion. This type of legislation puts women’s health at risk by preventing doctors from making decisions based on their professional medical judgment, in consultation with their patients.

In addition to replacing medical expertise with political will, this bill provides the narrowest of exceptions for abortions after 20 weeks: to prevent death of the mother and substantial and irreversible impairment of a major bodily function of the mother. But with no definition of “major bodily function,” it is unclear when this exception applies. There are no exceptions for pregnancies that result from rape or incest. There are no exceptions for fetal anomalies. Every woman’s circumstance is different, and this bill takes away her ability to decide what is best for her.

Abortion bans punish women. Not only do they strip a woman of ability to make a personal medical decision, but they can force her to go through severe mental and physical trauma. A Texas woman was forced to wait for her fetus to die in utero and endure a stillbirth because of a similar law, something no one should have to experience.

Doctors are at risk of punishment, too. SB 3 bans a medically proven, safe method of abortion — anyone who performs that method is guilty of a third degree felony. Our lawmakers are criminalizing doctors for following their professional training and conscience. This is one of the many reasons why the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists opposes these types of restrictions.

Extreme legislation like SB 3 has been enacted, challenged, and temporarily blocked or not allowed to go into effect while litigation proceeds in four states because of the serious constitutional issues these types of laws raise. It would seem that Pennsylvania lawmakers would like to add us to the list of states being sued for extreme abortion bans.

While we may not agree about abortion, we can all agree that physicians and not politicians should be a part of the medical decision-making process. We cannot stand by while politicians push their agenda into our doctor’s offices, with no regard for the health and well-being of women. A woman’s health, not politics, should drive important medical decisions. Contact your legislators and remind them — they’re not medical experts and shouldn’t be meddling.

Senate Bill 3 passed the state Senate on February 8 and is now under consideration in the state House of Representatives. Call your state representative today to tell them to vote “NO” on SB 3. To find your state representative, use our “find your legislator” tool, enter your zip code, and look for your representative under “governor and state legislators.”

PA House Rushes to Vote on Extreme Anti-Abortion Bill

By Julie Zaebst, Director, Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project

IMG_2110

Update: June 21, 2016

Soon after this post was originally published in early April, HB 1948 stalled in the House. Now, the House is poised to take a final vote on the bill as early as this afternoon, Tuesday, June 21st. A companion bill, SB 888, has also been introduced in the Senate and has been referred to the Judiciary Committee.

April 6, 2016

Yesterday, the House Health Committee moved with breath-taking speed to vote on an extreme anti-abortion bill that would make it illegal to provide abortion care to some of the most vulnerable women in some of the most difficult circumstances. House Bill 1948 would ban abortion after 20 weeks and would ban the safest and most common method of second trimester abortion, preventing doctors from making decisions based on medical science and putting women’s health at risk.

The bill contains only a very narrow exception of the health and life of the woman – one that could force doctors to wait until the woman’s health deteriorates before providing her with the abortion care she desperately needs. And the bill includes no exception for rape, incest or fetal anomalies, which often aren’t discovered until a woman’s 20-week ultrasound.

Make no mistake – this is one of the most extreme abortion bans we’ve seen in any state legislature. Only two other states – Kansas and Oklahoma – have enacted this type of “method ban,” and both of these laws have been put on hold by the courts because they raise serious constitutional issues. Method bans substitute a political agenda for a doctor’s expert opinion about which procedure is best for their patient – and threaten doctors with criminal charges if they follow their professional training and conscience and perform an abortion using this method.

But the House Health Committee didn’t pause to consider the expert opinions of doctors or to ask themselves whether this bill would pass constitutional muster. The committee voted to advance HB 1948 just one business day after the legislation was introduced and after just an hour of debate. Members voted against holding a public hearing that would have provided an opportunity for the real experts – medical professionals and families who have sought later abortion care – to share their knowledge and experience with lawmakers.

Anti-choice lawmakers claim that abortion restrictions don’t “punish women,” as Donald Trump recently suggested they should. It’s true that HB 1948 wouldn’t impose criminal penalties on women – only on the medical professionals who are addressing women’s medical needs using evidence-based protocols that are the standard of care for their profession.

But let’s be clear, these types of restrictions do punish women. Just last week, we heard the story of a woman in Texas who was forced to wait for her fetus to die in utero and endure a stillbirth because of a similar type of restriction on later abortion care. When women and their families are confronted with complex medical issues like this, they deserve compassionate care guided by the best medical science – not political interference.

We can’t stand by while lawmakers ram through a dangerous bill with callous disregard for the health and well-being of women seeking later abortion care or for the medical expertise of the doctors who are doing their best to serve them. Contact your lawmaker today and let them know you believe a woman’s health, not politics, should drive important medical decisions.

——-

Julie Julie Zaebst has served as director of the Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project since 2014, bringing more than 10 years of experience as a program manager and advocate. A social worker by training, she previously worked in child welfare and as the associate director of the civic engagement Office at Bryn Mawr College.

Thank You, Abortion Providers!

By Marah Lange, MSW, former Duvall Project intern

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Last Wednesday was an important day in the fight to protect abortion access.

As the justices gathered to hear arguments in Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt, thousands came together outside the U.S. Supreme Court to have our voices heard: stop the sham. While Texas’s HB2 and similar laws are engineered to appear to be focused on protecting women’s health, they do just the opposite. In fact, they restrict access to safe abortion by placing medically unnecessary restrictions on providers and causing clinics to close. For patients, this creates an obstacle course of barriers to having an abortion. If I have to travel hundreds of miles for my procedure, who can watch my children? Will my employer allow me the time off I need to travel for my appointment? How will I afford the cost of travel in addition to the cost of my procedure?

This is something we need to be shouting about. And on March 2nd, we shouted! I was one of 60 people who took a 5 a.m. bus from Philadelphia to Washington, DC, to join the Rally to Protect Abortion Access that day. Once on board the bus, I sensed excitement, adventure and, with some bus mates who had been in the fight since Roe, camaraderie. I also felt some trepidation. This was my first large-scale abortion rally, and I did not know what to expect from the opposition. After some coffee, chanting, and eventually a sunrise, we arrived and joined over a thousand other advocates who came together to defend access to abortion (and to show off some fantastic posters).

The Rally to Protect Abortion Access was also a platform for celebration. Women gathered to share their abortion stories, leaders of the fight spoke of their mission to protect access, and abortion providers were met with cheers of gratitude for their dedication to caring for patients with respect and dignity. It was electric.

While advocates await the court’s decision in June, today marks the National Day of Appreciation for Abortion Providers. We observe this day each year on the anniversary of the death of Dr. David Gunn, one of several abortion providers and clinic workers murdered by an anti-choice extremists. It is a day to show our gratitude for the courageous medical professionals who provide abortion care despite political interference and often threats of violence. Each day, providers stand in solidarity with patients who have chosen abortion for themselves and their families. Today we stand with those same providers and say “thank you.”

Thank you, Providers!

THANK YOU to the providers who work hard every day to make sure that people across Pennsylvania have access to the abortion care they need! We appreciate all you do to make reproductive rights a reality. #AppreciateProviders #NDAAPPlanned Parenthood Southeastern Pennsylvania, Planned Parenthood Keystone, PPWP–Planned Parenthood of Western PA, Philadelphia Women's Center, Allentown Women's Center, Delaware County Women's Center, Allegheny Reproductive Health Center Physicians for Reproductive Health

Posted by ACLU of Pennsylvania on Thursday, March 10, 2016

Does Your Pharmacy Carry the Morning-After Pill?

By Kaziah White & Saskia Levy-Sheon, Interns, Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project

Emergency Contraception Map

We visited pharmacies around the region to find out if they had the morning-after pill in stock and if their employees incorrectly said there were age limits or asked for ID. The map shows you where you can easily get the morning-after pill.

During the summer of 2015, the Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project was asked to help collect data on the availability of emergency contraception (EC) at local pharmacies, as part of a nationwide survey created by the American Society for Emergency Contraception. Emergency contraception prevents pregnancy by stopping ovulation or keeping the egg and sperm from meeting if taken within three to five days after unprotected sex.

We surveyed 65 pharmacies in Philadelphia and on the Main Line. These pharmacies range from the well-stocked store with multiple types of EC to the empty room with a few chairs and a well-meaning pharmacist offering us a “good price” on a generic brand of the morning-after pill.

The survey asks about where EC is located within the store, as well as what brands are available and how much they cost. It also involves asking pharmacy staff if you have to be a certain age to purchase EC and if men can buy it.

The Food and Drug Administration regulations for emergency contraception have rapidly changed within the past few years. One-pill EC is now available over the counter to anyone, regardless of age or gender. However, a number of the pharmacies we visited aren’t consistently following these new regulations. Employees have asked us for ID, or told us that EC can only be purchased by people over age 15, 17 or 18. When employees give out misinformation like this to their customers, it prevents young women from accessing the emergency health care that they need in order to prevent pregnancy. Keeping EC behind the pharmacy counter or in a locked display case in the aisle creates another barrier to access, as young people may feel embarrassed or uncomfortable asking a staff member to retrieve it for them.

The Duvall Project’s new resource for young people seeking health care on their own, Your Body, Your Rights, gives information about emergency contraception and teens’ rights to access it, regardless of age or gender. This information is critical because emergency contraception is often the last step one can take to prevent an unplanned pregnancy. However, conducting this survey showed us that practice hasn’t caught up with policy, and teens might have trouble getting EC at their local pharmacies if the staff there aren’t familiar with the new regulations.

In our research we discovered patterns of access to EC across Philadelphia. About a third of the Center City pharmacies that we visited gave us inaccurate information about age limits. We also found that non-chain pharmacies, which are more prevalent in low-income areas of the city, are far more likely to keep EC behind the pharmacy counter or in locked display cases and to provide inaccurate age limits.

The next step in our process was to create a two-pronged approach to help ensure that teens have access to EC. We started by contacting the pharmacies that provided us with misinformation in order to ask them to train their staff on the new federal regulations around EC. Second, we developed an interactive map to help teens learn which pharmacies make EC is most accessible and affordable. The interactive maps helps guide teenagers to pharmacies that will respect their control over their own bodies and give them the resources that they need. Until all pharmacy practices are in line with current regulations, the EC map will provide a valuable tool for youth to protect their reproductive freedom.

Visit ybyr.org to use the interactive map!

ACLU-PA Takes Lead In Campaign For Women’s Health

By Julie Zaebst, Project Manager, Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project

facebook.Justice4.StandWithPregnantWorkers.2015Yesterday, a bipartisan group of legislators came together in Harrisburg to introduce a legislative Agenda for Women’s Health. Lately, when I hear lawmakers use the phrase “women’s health,” it makes me cringe. How have lawmakers across the country justified passing completely unnecessary regulations that require abortion clinics to have hospital-grade elevators and driveways large enough to accommodate an ambulance – a move clearly (and successfully) designed to close dozens of clinics? These regulations are necessary to protect “women’s health,” of course. Why are state legislatures rushing to require abortion providers to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital, when complications from abortion are extremely rare and hospitals are already required to treat patients experiencing a medical emergency? Well, it’s a matter of “women’s health.”

You can understand my skepticism when the words “women’s health” come out of a politician’s mouth.

But the package of bills unveiled in Harrisburg is different. The legislation was developed by the bipartisan, bicameral Women’s Health Caucus, with the input of advocates (including real women! And real experts in women’s health!) It recognizes that women’s health and well-being are impacted by a range of issues, from economic fairness and family-friendly workplace policies to real access to reproductive and comprehensive health care. In a departure from what we’ve often seen in Harrisburg, the legislation proposes evidence-based strategies to address real health issues that women across Pennsylvania face every day.

The ACLU of Pennsylvania is excited to be a leader in the Campaign for Women’s Health, a statewide advocacy coalition supporting this package of bills. We know that advocates are tired of fighting senseless proposal after senseless proposal to restrict access to abortion care, when their families and communities have real health needs the legislature could address. This campaign gives advocates the opportunity to rally around legislation that would make real improvements in the health and well-being of women across the state right now. In fact, last legislative session, three bills that were a part of the Campaign for Women’s Health were signed into law. This includes a bill that prohibits municipalities from punishing victims of crime, including survivors of domestic violence, for calling for emergency services.

I’m looking forward to more legislative successes this session – and to being able to keep a straight face when Pennsylvania lawmakers utter the words “women’s health.”

You can learn more about the Campaign for Women’s Health and how to get involved at www.pa4womenshealth.org.

Using ‘Artivism’ to Combat Abortion Stigma

By Marah Lange, MSW Intern, Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project

In my time as an intern at the Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project, I have considered ways I could connect my work to my experience as a student at the University of Pennsylvania. Since attending Abortion Out Loud: Lifting the Scarlet A last fall at Haverford College and hearing Louise Melling, Director of Center of Liberty and Deputy Legal Director at the ACLU, speak about the impact of abortion stigma in the legislature and more broadly, I have been eager to play my part in fighting stigma.

Last week, the 1 in 3 Campaign gave me that chance in the form of “artivism.” As a grassroots organization, the 1 in 3 Campaign is dedicated to creating a platform where women can share their stories in an effort to “build a culture of compassion, empathy, and support for access to basic health care”. Since 1 in 3 women will have an abortion in their lifetime, each will undoubtedly have a different set of circumstances surrounding their experience and sharing those stories is powerful.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


These images are part of an “artivism” display at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Social Policy and Practice to help support the 1 in 3 campaign.

To support this campaign, I and many other student activists across the country posted real stories of women and their abortions in busy public spaces on our campuses. It was my intention for these stories to spark conversation among fellow students and to shed light on the fact that many women will make the decision to have an abortion and that is okay. I am hopeful that this small attempt at fighting stigma will have an effect on my campus and that those who observed the display will carry the stories with them as social work professionals and advocates moving forward.

To see the full display, please visit the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Social Policy and Practice.

Supreme Court Decision in Young v. UPS Highlights Need for Change in Pennsylvania

By Marah Lange, MSW Candidate, University of Pennsylvania

Map

Last week, women across the country celebrated when the Supreme Court ruled in support of pregnant workers in the case Young v. UPS.

When Peggy Young was pregnant with her now 7-year-old daughter, her doctor recommended she not lift more than 20 pounds. What happened next takes place all too often: UPS, her employer at the time, refused to provide her temporary accommodations, as it typically did for other workers, including people with disabilities, people with on-the-job injuries, and even people who had lost their commercial drivers’ licenses as a result of DUI convictions.

Despite Peggy’s willingness to keep working with simple modifications to her job, she was forced to take unpaid leave and go without income during a time when she needed it most. So Peggy went to court.

Last week’s Supreme Court decision sent Peggy’s case back to the lower courts, which originally ruled in UPS’s favor. And more importantly, it signaled to all employers that if they are accommodating most other workers with injuries or disabilities while refusing to accommodate most pregnant workers who need it, they are likely violating the Pregnancy Discrimination Act.

While this ruling is a significant victory, many pregnant workers may continue to face difficulty requesting and receiving temporary accommodations or successfully challenging employers that discriminate. For example, women in smaller workplaces, women who are new to their jobs, and workers with limited bargaining power may not know their employers’ accommodations policies or the accommodations their co-workers have received.

That’s why 13 states, including Peggy’s home state of Maryland, have passed legislation to strengthen protections for pregnant workers. Now it’s time for Pennsylvania legislators to step up to the plate. The Pennsylvania Pregnant Workers Fairness Act would strengthen protections for pregnant workers and help ensure that women aren’t put in the unnecessary and unsafe position of choosing between the health of their pregnancies and their jobs. This is especially critical for women working in low-wage jobs and for the 41 percent of families in which women are the primary breadwinners.

In order for women to have the freedom to make reproductive decisions for themselves and their families – like decision to have a child while working – temporary and reasonable accommodations for pregnant workers are a must.

Marah Lange is an MSW Candidate at the University of Pennsylvania. She currently interns for the Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project.

“Save Roe”

By Julie Zaebst, Project Manager, Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project

IMG_8153

It has been 42 years since the Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade legalized abortion, but somehow, on this cold, slushy Thursday, I found myself standing in the middle of Broad Street holding a sign that said “Save Roe.”

Some days, I wonder how we got to the point where it doesn’t seem far-fetched to say that Roe needs saving. Today, though, I was grateful to stand with a small crowd in Center City Philadelphia and remind passersby what safe, legal abortion means for women and their families. Of course, it’s about the ability to decide when and under what circumstances to take on the incredible responsibility of having a child. But it’s also about access to basic health care for women. It’s about financial stability. It’s about opportunities and dreams. It’s about respect and equality.

A lot of people on Broad Street today understood that. We got honks of support and thumbs-up. People rolled down their car windows to cheer and say thank you. The only counter-protestor who dared to join us kept her headphones in the whole time.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


(This rally was organized by Planned Parenthood Southeastern pennsylvania)

I wish I could have brought members of Congress out today to see that the American people get it – and that we’re paying attention. Late last night, the House of Representatives dropped plans to vote on a bill that would have banned abortion after the 20th week of pregnancy, amid concerns about the “optics” of the issue. This sounds like a victory, but instead, the House approved a bill that targets abortion access for low-income women: HR 7 would ban federal insurance coverage of abortion, including in insurance policies sold on the state exchanges.

I’m afraid I’ll be back on Broad Street at this time next year, still holding my “Save Roe” sign. I hope you’ll be there to join me.

ACLU ACTION >> Protect Women’s Reproductive Decisions

Julie Julie Zaebst joined the ACLU-PA in July 2014, bringing more than 10 years of experience as a program manager and advocate.