Meet Caleb Christ, the 2018-19 Frankel Adair Scholar

The Frankel-Adair scholarship provides $1,500 in support of post-secondary education to an LGBQ&T student residing in the greater Philadelphia area. The scholarship honors the late Larry Frankel, former executive and legislative director of the ACLU-PA, and the benefactor, Thomas T. Adair. For more information about the scholarship, visit this link.

What were the most important events or influences that brought you to where you are today?

My lived experience as both a queer person and a transgender man motivated my pursuing a second undergraduate degree in the field of nursing. Interning at the Allentown Women’s Center and having the opportunity to help develop and implement their transgender health program sparked my passion for healthcare. I have been an advocate for people accessing transition-related healthcare, navigating insurance hurdles, and breaking down barriers to care. I would not be where I am today if I had not been able to access affirming, transition-related healthcare that allows me to live as my authentic self.

What do you see as the critical issues facing the LGBQ&T community at this time?

Access to expert healthcare for LGB and especially transgender communities is critical, along with health insurance that meets the unique needs of these communities. We also must address the ways that racism, class, and incarceration create barriers to healthcare, housing, and employment.

Do you envision your own career having an impact on concerns of the LGBQ&T community?

Healthcare as a whole has been slow to implement the level of training necessary to provide truly affirming care for transgender patients. Though LGBTQ competency is beginning to be included in health and medical education, there are many gaps. I hope to advocate for LGBTQ patients through the care I provide, through research and policy, and through clinical excellence.

What other social issues motivate you?

Sexual health and reproductive rights, rethinking the carceral system, homelessness, substance use, mental health and wellness — all these issues have an impact on access to healthcare and are crucial to address in tandem with being a healthcare provider.

The Philadelphia Police Department has a Racism Problem

By Reggie Shuford, Executive Director, ACLU of Pennsylvania

The job of a police officer is to serve and protect the community, no matter the racial, ethnic, religious, or socio-economic status of that community. Real justice is blind, and police officers are the front-line arbiters of justice in America.

But as a new, comprehensive report and database from the Plain View Project makes clear, many of the police officers in Philadelphia and across the country operate under a vision of justice that is anything but unbiased.

The analysis, which was first reported by Buzzfeed News, provides a searchable, public database of deeply disturbing social media posts from police officers in Philadelphia and seven other police departments, including York, Pennsylvania. While the names of people who interacted with the posts have been redacted, the names of the police officers who authored the posts have not.

The bottom line? The Philadelphia Police Department has a racism problem. Fortunately, the Plain View Project database names names, revealing exactly which officers are not fit to fulfill their duties to serve and protect.

The deep-seeded racism plaguing the department won’t be unraveled overnight. While the police officers whose hate-filled posts have been exposed should be dismissed immediately, the racism in the Philadelphia Police Department can’t and won’t be rooted out until the department faces the issue head-on. After all, this culture most assuredly runs deeper than the police officers who made publicly viewable social media posts.

People of color already have legitimate reasons for lacking trust in law enforcement in Philadelphia; our ongoing litigation over stop-and-frisk practices has proved that time and again. The behavior exposed by this report provides even more evidence for why that distrust is warranted. Hundreds of police officers in Philadelphia openly express hostility and antipathy toward the people they “serve.”

And the report only exposes those officers who did not hide their views behind a privacy wall. How many more officers say the same thing under the cloak of stronger privacy settings?

Over the past decade, with the emergence of smartphone technology, the epidemic of police violence driven by apparent racial animus has been well-documented. While many thought that the use of police body cameras would offer a measure of accountability that might prevent police killings, those hopes have been dashed as police officer after police officer wins acquittal in cases where their killing of unarmed civilians was caught on video.

The disturbing social media posts uncovered by the Plain View Project reinforce the sad reality that police can get away with anything, from brazen racism to murder.

Police culture in Philadelphia and across the nation must change. But it can’t change if those in power —mayors, police commissioners, city council members— don’t address the problem boldly and urgently. Until then, it’s difficult to see how the public – particularly communities of color – can trust police to do their jobs, leaving “serve and protect” as nothing but a bitter punchline.

Police Are Ill-Equipped to Help People With Mental Health Disorders

Osaze Osagie (photo courtesy of the Osagie family)


By Reggie Shuford, Executive Director, ACLU of Pennsylvania

Last month, District Attorney Bernie Cantorna of Centre County, Pennsylvania, announced that his office would not criminally charge three State College police officers who were involved in the shooting death of Osaze Osagie, a 29-year-old Black man, in March. Osaze was shot and killed in his own apartment building. The only reason the officers were there is because his parents called the police to ask for help with their son, who was having a mental health crisis. The police responded to the parents’ plea to help a mentally ill person, and they ended up shooting the young unarmed Black man dead.

Cantorna’s decision wasn’t surprising, of course. Despite the epidemic of officer-involved killings – 992 people were shot and killed by police in the United States in 2018, disproportionately people of color – officers are rarely charged by prosecutors. And when they are charged, they are rarely convicted, even in a case like the death of Antwon Rose, a 17-year-old boy who was unarmed and running away from a traffic stop when he was killed by Officer Michael Rosfeld in East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, last year. Rose’s death was filmed by a bystander, but the jury acquitted Rosfeld anyway.

In Osaze’s case, there were no witnesses, and there was no video footage. There were four people on the scene; one of them is dead and the other three are police officers. So, Cantorna was left with only the officers’ stories in conducting his investigation. When he announced his decision, Cantorna effectively acted as a mouthpiece for the police. And he refused to name the officers involved, leaving people in State College to wonder who on the police force killed a man.

Osaze came to the attention of the State College police because his family was concerned that he may have been having a mental health crisis. The officers knew this when they approached his door. According to a statement released by the family, Osaze’s father was in the neighborhood, looking for him. DA Cantorna stated that all three officers had crisis intervention training and one had been trained as a crisis negotiator.

And yet, with all of that training and Cantorna’s contention that the officers followed it, Osaze still ended up dead.

The fact is that police officers should not be first responders to people who are in crisis. When they are, the odds increase that the person in crisis will be killed. Research indicates that at least 25 percent of people who are killed by police are in crisis. Helping people who are struggling with mental health disorders is a public health issue and is better left to healthcare professionals.

Some cities in the United States are taking this approach, sending crisis counselors or at least paramedics and nurses to the scene when the situation does not involve a crime in progress. And for the narrow situations in which police must respond, their training needs a total overhaul, to emphasize de-escalation techniques.

It was disappointing and, frankly, a bit frightening that DA Cantorna actually suggested loosening Pennsylvania law to make it easier for police to intervene with people with mental health disorders. State law only allows involuntary commitment when a person is an imminent danger to harm themselves or others. Cantorna’s rationale is that broadening the law will allow intervention before a person is in crisis.

While his reasoning sounds logical, in practice, it would likely lead to more tragedies like the death of Osaze Osagie. As long as police culture and training cling to a mentality of control and violence, giving police more power to engage a person who has not committed a crime is a terrible idea. The public needs less interaction with the police, not more.

According to Cantorna, more than 300 mental health warrants were served in Centre County in 2018. And Osaze’s death was the first officer-involved killing in the State College Police Department’s 100-year history.

That is little solace to the Osagie family, who called the police to help their son, not kill him.