Fairness and Accountability in School Discipline

By Harold Jordan, Community Organizer, ACLU of Pennsylvania

Harold Jordan

Harold Jordan

On April 11, 2014, the School Discipline Advocacy Service (SDAS) held a symposium, “Fairness and Accountability in School Discipline: Using the Dignity in Schools Campaign’s Model Code to Improve School Climate in Philadelphia’s Charter Schools.” I was one of the featured speakers. SDAS is a coalition of law students who advocate for Philadelphia students facing suspension, transfer, or expulsions, both in the school district and in charter schools.

My presentation focused on how to achieve fairness and accountability in charter school discipline. Charters are privately-managed, but publically-funded schools that are run independently of the regular school system. This feature makes public accountability more challenging, especially in the areas of student discipline and student placement. I explained that charters are not exempt from the Constitution, some state education laws, and the federal school discipline guidance.

SDAS is a coalition of law students who advocate for Philadelphia students facing suspension, transfer, or expulsion, both in the School District and in charter schools.

SDAS is a coalition of law students who advocate for Philadelphia students facing suspension, transfer, or expulsion, both in the School District and in charter schools.

Other featured speakers were Matt Cregor of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights and Economic Justice (Boston) and David Lapp of the Education Law Center of Pennsylvania. The presentations were followed by a community panel of charter school administrators, student groups, and teacher activists organizing on the ground to effect change. Some 100 persons participated in the symposium.

2 thoughts on “Fairness and Accountability in School Discipline

  1. It was an excellent panel with a lot really wonderful discussion from youth, teachers, administrators, and stakeholders about the challenges of changing school discipline practices. The biggest takeaway for me was that school policies can only change when school cultures and climates change from a focus on control and discipline to a focus on relationship building, respect, and trust between all members of a school community. Harold did an excellent job not only during his presentation but also during the community panel!

  2. Pingback: South Fayette Update – Supplying Our Own Light | John Linko

Comments are closed.